Reports

Today, many reports produced by governments or other organisations are accessed online, though paper copies are often still produced. Older reports were produced only on paper and may or may not have been made accessible online subsequently.

A paper version of a report can be referenced just like a book. In the case of government reports from the UK, the publisher may be the department which published it, or may be The Stationery Office, which publishes many UK Government documents. In the case of other organisations, the publisher of the report is likely to be the organisation that produced it, and the publisher would be given as “Author”. Reports often feature corporate authors, such as a government department or an organisation such as the British Psychological Society.

An online version of a report can be referenced just like a website. See examples below. 

UK Government department as the author of report, paper version

UK Department of Health. (2010). Healthy Lives, Healthy People: Our Strategy for Public Health in England. London, UK: The Stationary Office.

(UK Department of Health, 2010)

UK Government department as the author of report, accessed online

UK Department of Health. (2010). Healthy Lives, Healthy People: Our Strategy for Public Health in England. Retrieved from https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/healthy-lives-healthy-people-our-strategy-for-public-health-in-england.

(UK Department of Health, 2010)

Other organisation as author of report, paper version

British Psychological Society, Division of Clinical Psychology. (2016). Understanding Hoarding: When Our Relationship with Possessions Goes Wrong. Leicester, UK: British Psychological Society.

As above but accessed online

British Psychological Society, Division of Clinical Psychology. (2016). Understanding Hoarding: When Our Relationship with Possessions Goes Wrong. Retrieved from https://www1.bps.org.uk/system/files/user-files/Division%20of%20Clinical%20Psychology/public/understanding_hoarding_web.pdf